Author Topic: Music Therapy  (Read 10611 times)

rstarr

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Music Therapy
« on: June 25, 2009, 04:00:26 PM »
If you are caring for a loved one who is terminally ill, you may feel overwhelmed at times.  You want so much to help, to DO something, but just don't know what or how. Music is so nurturing; it is a gift that you can give your loved one that very well might bring you both back to happier times,recalling earlier times together before your loved one was sick.
I have seen non-verbal patients suddenly communicate through songs; families holding hands around their loved one's bed, as they sing his favorite songs; and patients whose faces light up when hearing a certain favorite song, as if they had just found their long lost friend.
Have you ever had a "healing" or "therapuetic" experience with music that you'd like to share?
Rima Starr CMT

rstarr

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Re: Music Therapy
« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2009, 07:49:06 AM »
My father was no longer making any sense. He thought I was his brother.
As a child, he and I had enjoyed singing "barbershop", which he taught me,
which led into other musical genres of the 40's, e.g., Jolson, Sinatra, etc.
While he lay dying in a hospital bed, I began to slowly sing "Down by the Old
Mill Stream." He listened, smiled, and then joined me in harmony. It was a
beautiful moment, reconnecting present with past. We shared our love
through music.

                                                                 Len
« Last Edit: July 02, 2009, 11:01:43 AM by wpurdy »

rstarr

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Re: Music Therapy
« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2009, 09:17:38 AM »
Thanks Len, for sharing that poignant story about you and your father.
Caregivers who deal with Dimentia have their own "special" kind of pain, because, in a way, you have "lost" your loved one long before the actual physical loss occurrs.  But, as the brain deteriorates in these patients, the music center of the brain is the last part to go. Often they can remember nothing, but can still remember the words to songs they sang many years ago.
Yours was a perfect example of how something so seemingly simple as a song, can be so profound.
Thanks again.
Rima

DonnaR

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Re: Music Therapy
« Reply #3 on: July 05, 2009, 06:27:56 PM »
I was so moved by Lenny's story as it sounds alot like my relationship with my grandfather. My grandfather died at age 88yrs old while living in a nursing home. He chose to go to a nursing home to live with my grandmother when she could no longer live on her own due to Alzeihmers. My grandfather was a quiet man, but very sociable and he loved to sing. He would sing to me all the time "When Irish Eyes are Smiliing", "Come onna My House", "Yes, We have no Banana's" on and on. He was so funny. During his final days in the nursing home following my grandmother's death, he was so depressed and was just wanting to die. He had no more reason to live. I would sit by his bedside and try to connect to him, to make him happy the way he had made me happy duiring my childhood. A man with so much patients and love for me, was so impatient waiting to pass on. I sang to him. I sang the songs he sang to me and he would smile and he would talk about some of the memories we shared. This is so important to know that even in our darkest moments there are such precious memories that can bring moments of joy and solice until we have passed on to the next world.

mgunther

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Re: Music Therapy
« Reply #4 on: July 24, 2009, 05:33:37 PM »
When my daughter was about 2 years old, we use to listen to songs together to help her go to sleep. We had several favorites, but perhaps the one I sang the most was a simple lullaby written by Chris Williamson; Like a ship in the harbor The lyrics describe, a ship in a harbor, a mother and child , a light in the darkness and the precious moment of holding and being held by your beloved. I still recall the warmth of my daughter's sweaty head as it fell next to my shoudler as she relaxed into sleep.
Now, I find I will spontaneously hum the same tune to myself during stressful moments, and immediately feel relaxed and calm.

Marianne
« Last Edit: July 25, 2009, 02:38:27 PM by mgunther »

hans17santos

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Re: Music Therapy
« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2011, 12:05:10 AM »
My brother was suffering from one serious problem before two years. It was lung problem. Very bad experience. He loves to listen songs from his childhood. Music is really great. only music made him relax always whenever he suffers.

rogerborg

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Re: Music Therapy
« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2012, 08:42:47 AM »
I was so relocated by Lenny's tale as it noise a lot like my relationship alongside my grandfather. My grandfather died at just age 88yrs past times while residing in a breastfeeding home. He chose to go up to a breastfeeding home to live alongside my grandmother whenever she can not alive on her personal due to Alzeihmers. My grandfather had been a quiet guy, but extremely sociable and also he enjoyed to perform. He might sing to me personally all of the time "Whenever Irish Eyes are really Smiliing", "Come onna My House", "Yes, We do not have Banana's" on and also in. He was actually so funny. For the duration of his final days inside the nursing home following my grandmother's death, he had been so stressed out as well as was actually simply wanting to die. He had no a lot more factor to live on. I would sit by his bedside and try to connect to him, which will make him happy just how he had earned me happy duiring my youth. A man alongside so much people and really love in my situation, ended up being so impatient wishing to pass on. I sang to him. I sang the records he sang to me personally and also he would smile and also he would talk about a few of the experiences you shared. This really is essential to understand which actually in our darkest moments there tend to be really important memories that may bring moments of joy and also solice until we have passed on to the next world.

lilijohn

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Re: Music Therapy
« Reply #7 on: January 02, 2013, 12:20:12 AM »
I was so moved by Lenny's story